Kansas Department of Transportation "...to provide a statewide transportation system to meet the needs of Kansas."
    
 
 
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New 2003-2004 State Transportation Maps Available
Old maps saved for schools


Feb. 3, 2003 (03-011)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

For more information, contact:
Kim Stich, (785) 296-3585

Whether you want to drive across the state, find out where the closest airport is located, learn all the county names, or discover new places of interest, the new 2003-2004 Kansas Official State Transportation Map published by the Kansas Department of Transportation has it all.

New state maps featuring Governor Kathleen Sebelius are available at the 11 Kansas Travel Information Centers as well as from KDOT’s Bureau of Transportation Information.

“This state map is a wonderful source of information for both the citizens and visitors of Kansas,” said Secretary of Transportation Deb Miller. “Several state agencies worked together to provide this publication that will greatly benefit the traveling public.”

One new item is the Lewis and Clark Trail which was added in honor of the bicentennial celebration planned in 2004. City and county indexes are above the map as well as a distance map that allows motorists to pick the best route to their destination.

On the back of the map are highlights of just a few of the many attractions,

events and interesting places throughout the state. Kansas City, Wichita, Topeka and 14 other city insets are featured. There is also information on road conditions, visitor resources and other helpful phone numbers and web sites.

In keeping with Governor Sebelius’ goal to save state funds wherever possible, KDOT will continue to distribute the 2001-2002 state maps to fulfill requests from schools. Old maps can be requested from KDOT’s Transportation Information office or KDOT’s District offices in Topeka, Salina, Norton, Chanute, Hutchinson and Garden City.

“The old maps are still a valuable instructional tool and can be used to help educate our students,” Governor Sebelius said. “This is an excellent way to utilize our resources.”